Union Defeat In Chattanooga

Union

UAW Suffers Massive Defeat

The UAW is in its death thralls.  Membership is down dramatically and it needs a new source of membership; enter the southern manufacturing states.

Labor leaders say a “yes” vote is critical to the union’s long-term prospects. If successful, this would be the first victory for organized labor inside a foreign automaker’s U.S. operations in the South.

For the UAW to grow, it must make inroads with foreign manufacturers with plants in the United States; most of those operate in the South. A “yes” vote in Chattanooga could provide momentum for organizing at a Mercedes-Benz plant in Alabama, a BMW plant in South Carolina and possibly a Nissan plant in Mississippi.

The vote was last night – and the results?

CHATTANOOGA, Tenn. — In a defeat for organized labor in the South, employees at the Volkswagen plant here voted 712 to 626 against joining the United Automobile Workers.

The union lost a massive vote and much, if not all, of its momentum in trying to unionize the south.

Watch For Political Shenanigans

There is no question that unions in here in the United States are nothing more than fronts for, and the fundraising arm of, the democrat party.  Everyone from the NEA to the UAW to the SEIU do nothing more than funnel campaign money into democrat candidate’s election efforts.

For examples of the relationship, look no further than the Obama administration’s cozy relationship with these groups, the exemptions granted under Obamacare and the absolute stunning ruling on the Boeing plant in South Carolina.

What does this add up to?  A power play to be sure:

“We’re obviously deeply disappointed,” said Bob King, the U.A.W.’s president at a news conference. “We’re also outraged by the outside interference,” he added, noting that a United States senator, Tennessee’s governor and various leaders of the state legislature attacked his union’s efforts.

Mr. King said he thought the pressures from Tennessee’s politicians were what swung the election. Last fall, the union said a majority of the plant’s workers had signed cards saying they favored joining the U.A.W.

“We’ll look at our legal options over the next few days,” he said, presumably meaning the union might consider filing a complaint with the N.L.R.B. about improper actions to influence how workers voted.

This isn’t so subtle code for, “We’ll use the force of corruption in DC to overturn the vote of employees.”

Card Check

By the way, notice the wistful wishing of unions across America:

Last fall, the union said a majority of the plant’s workers had signed cards saying they favored joining the U.A.W.

Card check.

Card check is a method whereby employees sign a card expressing their desire to form a union.  The difference between card check and secret ballot?

In a secret ballot the union isn’t able to use force, coercion and threats to intimidate employees to vote for the union.  With card check the union is free to keep track of who has – and who hasn’t – signed up.  Armed with this knowledge, the union is able to harass and intimidate employees.

Hardly a sign of representation.

The vote in Tennessee is a great one.  It represents a victory for the American worker and a way of life that recognizes excellence and ingenuity, innovation and hard work.  The vote rejects cronyism, intimidation and political corruption.

12 responses to “Union Defeat In Chattanooga

  1. “We’re also outraged by the outside interference (by government)”

    Haha! Here’s a tissue. They’re all against “interference” when it doesn’t help them achieve their goal, but all fine and dandy with the government going in and bullying on their behalf (see Boeing).

    • They’re all against “interference” when it doesn’t help them achieve their goal, but all fine and dandy with the government going in and bullying on their behalf (see Boeing).

      Oh, and they have no problem with Obama “influencing” the election.

  2. So why did Bob Corker have to lie about the new project they’d get?

    And why would a senator interfere in a labor issue where the employer doesn’t care about unionization?

    While we’re at it, using the phrase “democrat party” make you sound like a two-bit radio hack. If you want to sit around repeating Drudge headlines, at least dress it up a bit.

    • So why did Bob Corker have to lie about the new project they’d get?

      First, while I oppose Unions protected by laws, I have no problem if you and your McFriends decide that you need a McRaise and go to your McBoss and make the case that unless said raise is forthcoming, y’all will McQuit.

      Further, it sounds like the whole reason for the Union is to allow worker councils. Apparently there is a law that doesn’t allow formal Works Councils unless the employee are first represented. I haven’t read anything on that law, but I certainly would be in favor of management talking to the folks on the line too generate new ideas.

      The idea that such a relation be codified is silly.

      Now – why did Corker lie? I can’t know his mind but businesses make such manufacturing decisions all the time – see Boeing, Seattle and South Carolina. But one thing is for sure – there is no way that VW could admit it even if it’s true. Obama has seen to that through the coercive actions already.

      And why would a senator interfere in a labor issue where the employer doesn’t care about unionization?

      Why would a republican senator care about democrats installing a fundraising arm in the middle of his state? I can think of a bunch of reasons.

      While we’re at it, using the phrase “democrat party” make you sound like a two-bit radio hack. If you want to sit around repeating Drudge headlines, at least dress it up a bit.

      Oh for fucks sake.

      • Bob Corker lied in order to interfere with workers’ rights. That should bother you. I get that you don’t like unions and think they’re counter-productive, but that’s for the employer to deal with. Here the employer didn’t care and yet he interfered with the process because he’s afraid of labor. That’s very troubling to anyone who thinks that politicians shouldn’t spend their time hamstringing voters who happen to swing the other way. But you seem to be okay with it simply because “It’s all in the game.” That is profoundly, depressingly, nihilistic.

        And yes, I do think it makes you sound close-minded to use the term “democrat party”. It’s an epithet, albeit a silly one, but you may as well refer to it as “dumbocrats.” I know that your retort will be that we call GOPers all sorts of names, like “racist” and “moron”. To a degree, you’re right and it’s not constructive. But we do so when discussing actual policies that are racist and moronic and supported by the GOP. “Democrat party” is simply a pejorative that is meant to distance them as “the other.” Even William F Buckley opposed the term, because it had been abused so heavy-handedly by McCarthy. I know that you weren’t really involved in politics 10 years ago when this had a revival of interest, but it really is a big flashing sign that a person is basically a ditto-head.

        • Bob Corker lied in order to interfere with workers’ rights. That should bother you.

          Businesses make “production line” decisions based on all kinds of things – including labor costs.

          However, let’s say that VW isn’t using unionization as a consideration – they may be using state subsidies as one. And if Corker has had conversations with state legislators who have said such subsidies are dependent upon the vote … who knows?

          I can’t know and don’t pretend to know. But I DO know that local politicians here tout Carolina’s friendly labor environment as a selling point. We market ourselves based on the fact that we are a right to work state. So, if state legislators base decisions on union votes is that illegal? And if a politician, having conversation with such state legislators, represents that subsidies being sought by VW will be approved iff the union is defeated is illegal, then yeah, he should be prosecuted.

          But I don’t think it’s unreasonable for a state that has decided on a strategy of right to work to reward like minded organizations.

          That’s very troubling to anyone who thinks that politicians shouldn’t spend their time hamstringing voters who happen to swing the other way.

          I look forward to your post taking Obama to the woodshed for the same practice:

          That is profoundly, depressingly, nihilistic.

          It is – no doubt. And one of the reasons I question my continuation in this genre. I am desperately afraid that in 2-4-8 years I will be debated you in the reverse. That is a republican president with a minority party in the house playing the same bullshit reindeer games.

          Is it okay for Corker to lie? No. Is it okay for Obama to penalize Boeing in South Carolina? No.

          But what the fuck can we do about it?

          I know that you weren’t really involved in politics 10 years ago when this had a revival of interest, but it really is a big flashing sign that a person is basically a ditto-head.

          I really had no idea and certainly didn’t mean to employ the pejorative. When I wanna do that, there are plenty of options.

          • With respect to the Boeing issue, the NLRB is applying pretty sound precedent here. Going back to NLRB decision in 1991, you can’t move work from one place to another simply to save costs. Check out the Dubuque standard in this case. Even Politico acknowledges that the President has no control over this. I think it’s a pretty big leap to compare that to Corker making public comments about VW rewards that VW themselves have denied.

            With respect to Obama hamstringing the GOP base, how has he done it? Have rich old white men been disenfranchised? Gun owners still buy guns. Rich people stay rich. White people are still freely walking around.

            As for the pejorative, last night I was irritated because I’ve seen it pop up several times in your posts recently, and it seemed a purposeful shift. By light of day, I decided that you probably weren’t using it with the intent that political operations (such as Fox News, which does it constantly) do. But then why do you say it? Is it just mimicry of the pundits on your side? I can’t believe it was simply a coincidence, repeated so often. When we talk about dog whistles, you tend to say we’re over-reacting or seeing evil intent where there is none; but really, we’re working off a long memory of how people have been operating.

          • As for the pejorative, last night I was irritated because I’ve seen it pop up several times in your posts recently, and it seemed a purposeful shift.

            Now that I’m sitting here after swimming at the Y and now have a beer and am able to think of it —

            My whole political awareness thing started during the primaries leading up to the 08 election. I was kinda recently married, we had a new house and I was the father of very young children – things mattered more.

            I broke my chops over at Alan Colmes’ place – alan.com

            I referred to the party in one of the ways, democrat party or democratic party, and can’t remember. I caught hell for it so it was probably the first.

            Now, all these years later, I’m doing this blog. And I’ve noticed that I have a capitalization problem – I think that dedc mentioned that he’s amused by folks like me that capitalize things like Liberty and Bog Government. Anyway, I’m trying to correct that and struggle with the parties.

            If I really wanna insult or poke fun at y’ll I’ll use something like Libtard.

            All that aside – how weird is it that democrats find it insulting that they are referred to as democrat? Same with the whole shift from Liberal to Progressive [see, I did it again]. For those who think like me, it smacks of pure marketing and a defacto acknowledgement that the policy isn’t what’s important – rather is it selling?

            you can’t move work from one place to another simply to save costs.

            I think two things:

            1. You can try to save labor costs, you can’t try and punish union members for exercising their legal right to strike. A “right” I think is utter bullshit, but another day.

            2. They didn’t move the work, they opened a second line to clear a backlog. The original Dreamliner line remaining in Everret, they simply decided to open the new second line in South Carolina.

            With respect to Obama hamstringing the GOP base,

            No no no … he weighed in on the union vote before the election. Something about republicans loving German shareholders…..

    • Oh hey, look, now VW doesn’t want to do business in the South!

      Nah man, it ain’t the company – it’s the flippin union:

      “I can imagine fairly well that another VW factory in the United States, provided that one more should still be set up there, does not necessarily have to be assigned to the south again,” said Bernd Osterloh, head of VW’s works council.

      “If co-determination isn’t guaranteed in the first place, we as workers will hardly be able to vote in favor” of potentially building another plant in the U.S. south, Osterloh, who is also on VW’s supervisory board, said.

      The 20-member panel – evenly split between labor and management – has to approve any decision on closing plants or building new ones.

      • I wanted to simply bait you by asking you to show that it’s a union so I could shoot it down later, but I am already bored with fact-checking your comments. It’s not a union; the supervisory board is half-employee and half-shareholder, and they govern the company in non-insignificant ways (such as appointing board members). Check out this description: http://www.volkswagenag.com/content/vwcorp/content/en/investor_relations/corporate_governance/supervisory_board.html Unless you know a union where half of the union heads are appointed by the company, and that gets to determine company policy…

        Because it’s a German company they have worker protections built right into the corporate structure, which is why they weren’t phased by the UAW in the first place. And I’ve read some interviews with plant workers who voted no on the UAW not because they were anti-union but rather because they were simply anti-UAW, they wanted a different union in charge.

        I think this is far from over and I think Corker is going to look like even more of a liar by the end. But it’s clear now that VW is less willing to do business in the South.

        • It’s not a union;

          Nah man – it ain’t the company – it’s the flippin’ union.

          Volkswagen’s top labor representative threatened on Wednesday to try to block further investments by the German carmaker in the southern United States if its workers there are not unionized.

          It doesn’t matter what organization or board he is a member of, the man is a labor representative. The fact that hes on the sup board or works council is back of the baseball card trivia stuff.

          “If co-determination isn’t guaranteed in the first place, we as workers will hardly be able to vote in favor” of potentially building another plant in the U.S. south, Osterloh, who is also on VW’s supervisory board, said.

          We as workers will hardly be able to vote …

          I think this is far from over and I think Corker is going to look like even more of a liar by the end.

          Oh, it’s not over – the unions won’t give up.

          But it’s clear now that VW is less willing to do business in the South.

          No. You’re wrong.

          The WORKERS on the boards and councils are less willing to do business in the south.

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