Obamacare’s ProblemS Are Just Beginning

Doctor

Health Care Problems Ahead

When I have criticized the ACA in the past, I’ve done so for different reasons; none of them being a horrible website roll out.  With such issues as fewer doctors, rising premiums and political exemptions – the law is riddled with problems.

ACA Forcing Premiums To Rise

One of those problems is counter-intuitive.  The ACA is going to  force policies to rise.

In all the discussions regarding the benefits of the new law, including “free” contraceptives, for example, it has never been brought up by the defenders of the law that nothing, of course, is free.  That contraceptive package will have to be paid for by somebody – maybe even you.

And how will that cost be recouped?  Why, by raising the premiums on people, of course:

Based on a Manhattan Institute analysis of the HHS numbers, Obamacare will increase underlying insurance rates for younger men by an average of 97 to 99 percent, and for younger women by an average of 55 to 62 percent.

These prices are only going to continue to rise as Obama’s target market shuns the the law opting for a fine that might not ever be levied – the young and the healthy are fleeing the scene of the crime.  This results in only the older and the sicker enrolling; the most costly of the people covered.  The only result is a rise in policy costs.

No – make no mistake, the problems with Obamacare have nothing inherent to a failed and botched website – that’s only gravy in the pursuit in demonstrating that this administration is dangerously inept at management issues.

 

 

14 responses to “Obamacare’s ProblemS Are Just Beginning

  1. Actually things are improving rapidly, and it’s starting to become clear that the ACA is around for the long haul. Six million already are enrolled, and satisfaction with process is rising dramatically. It’s a major program but overall given what they’re doing the web problems are minor, and people are getting used to the clearly positive aspects of the law. I think this article sums up where the GOP may go here. They can’t defeat Obamacare, but they can either offer real alternatives or work with Democrats to improve portions that aren’t working as well. Finally the US is moving towards doing what every other advanced industrialized state does: create a chance for all citizens regardless of income to have health insurance (which equates to health care – people without insurance either don’t get it, get poorer and more expensive care, or often go bankrupt).

    One thing the act needs to really do is work to get health care costs under control. The good news is that health care costs have started in the last year to level off – they had been skyrocketing. Ultimately this is not a task markets can manage well without government regulation and involvment. Anyway, here’s the article: http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/plum-line/wp/2014/01/02/the-three-stages-of-obamacare-acceptance/

    • Your research shows that 6 million have enrolled, but we need to dig deeper into those numbers. How many of those people are young and healthy? How many are “buying” a policy without any government subsidy? I don’t claim to know all the facts, but I do know people. I know that most folks are very good at gaming the system. For this reason, I suspect that most of those 6 million people have run the numbers, and they have determined that they will be saving money be jumping in right away. If they are saving money, then someone else must be losing.

      I am not totally against the concepts that the ACA is based upon. I agree it is a noble cause; I just don’t believe that their are sufficient incentives in place to get Americans to do the right thing.

      In theory, everyone will be paying into the health care pot, so costs should come down. I look at auto insurance in my home state of Michigan. The law is very clear; everyone is REQUIRED to purchase auto insurance before operating a motor vehicle on the public roads. But guess what? MANY folks are on the roads everyday without auto insurance. They look at the cost of the coverage; they look at the penalties for not buying the coverage, and they make the choice to drive without auto insurance.

      • Your research shows that 6 million have enrolled

        I see no evidence of 6 million. I see 2 million – and may of them are not confirmed by the insurance company nor have they even paid yet.

        I agree it is a noble cause

        I suspect the rank and file democrat is in line with that. However, for the leaders of the democratic party – I’m not so sure that they don’t have ulterior motives.

        In theory, everyone will be paying into the health care pot, so costs should come down.

        Costs don’t come down until:

        1. You spend your own money
        2. You see what you are buying
        3. Companies are free to compete.

    • Six million already are enrolled

      Just over 2 million have enrolled.

      It’s a major program but overall given what they’re doing the web problems are minor

      Scott, the web problems are massive and getting massive’er. The front door sign up was a certifiable fiasco. The administration had 3 years to be ready for this day, 3 years and hundreds of millions of dollars. And they crewed the pooch.

      What still remains to be fixed is the security and the ability to communicate between agencies, states and insurance companies. The headaches are only beginnging.

      create a chance for all citizens regardless of income to have health insurance

      We had that on Tuesday – last day of 2013. Now we don’t. Remember, the cost of a catastrophic policy was 50 bucks – less than what half of the poor play on the lottery every month.

      often go bankrupt

      They are going bankrupt because they don’t have adequate savings, not because the medical bills are astronomically high.

      Ultimately this is not a task markets can manage well without government regulation and involvment.

      The market is the sinigle best way – and the more government regulation, the more expensive it becomes.

  2. “These prices are only going to continue to rise as Obama’s target market shuns the the law opting for a fine that might not ever be levied – the young and the healthy are fleeing the scene of the crime.”

    Indeed. There was almost no reason for young healthy people to have generous insurance policies before, even less now that Obamacare has introduced Universal Adverse Selection. Individual rates spiked about 300% with the rollout since now everyone has to pay as if they had pre-existing conditions. 4.7 million people have lost their policies, and the overwhelming majority of new additions are to the Medicaid expansion, making Obamcare a net loss among private policies, so expect to see some more upward adjustments now that the signups are basically done. So much for the +40 million coverage as advertised…

    • even less now that Obamacare has introduced Universal Adverse Selection.

      There is no reason. You can literally sign up for insurance after being diagnosed with a broken leg.

      making Obamcare a net loss among private policies,

      Think about that – a net loss of folks insured. And it’s going to get worse next year as businesses drop employees from plans.

  3. I’m coming at this issue with a perspective from both sides of the border (American and Canadian). The rule in Canada for health care as I’ve always known it is “Everyone Pays”. If you are under the poverty level your premiums are either reduced or waived – but only if you’re up to date on your tax returns. When I first heard about ACA I was hopeful (albeit skeptical) for the noble reasons other commenters have mentioned, but as soon as I heard “exemptions” with it I knew it was going to be a gongshow in the short-term and failure in the long-term.

    I think Krauthammer is right – ACA will be yet another excuse for a massive bailout by the Federal government, and moreso (my belief), the whole mess will be positioned perfectly for a pro-Hillary health care reform move come election-time. A win-win for Dems either way.

    • as soon as I heard “exemptions” with it I knew it was going to be a gongshow in the short-term and failure in the long-term.

      Just look at the crap so far that Obama has waived; unions, special interests and political allies — think Pelosi friends in California.

      • Yep. As much as I want to be “mad” about that, however, I still can’t get over the flat-out lies that are being allowed to slide from this Office whether it be over ObamaCare, NSA spying on Americans, or anything else, it seems. I never would have believed it could have come to this when I first came here.

        • I still can’t get over the flat-out lies that are being allowed to slide from this Office whether it be over ObamaCare, NSA spying on Americans, or anything else, it seems.

          He is a remarkably well liked man; a horrible HORRIBLE president to be sure, but well liked. I have otherwise very intelligent “would like to be republican” fiends who still, to this day, support him.

          Truly fascinating.

          • I am still convinced that Obama will be remembered as one of the greatest Presidents of our era, and that the ACA will be a long term success. Time will tell – the ups and downs of daily politics often obscure the long term meaning.

          • I am still convinced that Obama will be remembered as one of the greatest Presidents of our era

            He isn’t the greatest president of the last 2.

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